Yeyo Belafonte



Pyramid Vritra - Palace

Flying Lotus - Never Catch Me (Feat. Kendrick Lamar)

So captivating.

Aaron Sorkin: Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Death Saved 10 Lives

"Phil Hoffman and I had two things in common. We were both fathers of young children, and we were both recovering drug addicts. Of course I’d known Phil’s work for a long time—since his remarkably perfect film debut as a privileged, cowardly prep-school kid in Scent of a Woman—but I’d never met him until the first table read forCharlie Wilson’s War, in which he’d been cast as Gust Avrakotos, a working-class CIA agent who’d fallen out of favor with his Ivy League colleagues. A 180-degree turn.

On breaks during rehearsals, we would sometimes slip outside our soundstage on the Paramount lot and get to swapping stories. It’s not unusual to have these mini-AA meetings—people like us are the only ones to whom tales of insanity don’t sound insane. “Yeah, I used to do that.” I told him I felt lucky because I’m squeamish and can’t handle needles. He told me to stay squeamish. And he said this: “If one of us dies of an overdose, probably 10 people who were about to won’t.” He meant that our deaths would make news and maybe scare someone clean.

So it’s in that spirit that I’d like to say this: Phil Hoffman, this kind, decent, magnificent, thunderous actor, who was never outwardly “right” for any role but who completely dominated the real estate upon which every one of his characters walked, did not die from an overdose of heroin—he died from heroin. We should stop implying that if he’d just taken the proper amount then everything would have been fine.

He didn’t die because he was partying too hard or because he was depressed—he died because he was an addict on a day of the week with a y in it. He’ll have his well-earned legacy—-his Willy Loman that belongs on the same shelf with Lee J. Cobb’s and Dustin Hoffman’s, his Jamie Tyrone, his Truman Capote and his Academy Award. Let’s add to that 10 people who were about to die who won’t now.”

-Aaron Sorkin

The Celestics - 173 (Feat. Waldo) (Pipo Version)

The Celestics (Kaytranada & his brother Louie P) have teamed up with youngin Waldo and Mortal Kombat murked one of Kay’s heaviest productions to date in a surprisingly boastful yet astoundingly impressive and convincing way.  A little jarring horn at first, a little slow and potentially unmemorable build, but the hit removes all doubts of trap kingship and blows the trio further past their bigger contemporaries like Migos, Quan, and Young Thug.

Kaytranada, Waldo, The Celestics, GoldLink, Sango, Tom Misch, Jeremiah Jae, PARTYNEXTDOOR, Evian Christ, Stwo, Ta-ku, Azizi Gibson, ESTA., LAKIM, Mr. Carmack, HW&W, and Soulection are really on something here

Flying Lotus - Never Catch Me (Feat. Kendrick Lamar)

New FlyLo goes in on the jazz tip.  Didn’t know if K Dot would work well with Fly but this bests the Herbie Hancock feature he released by continents. With all he’s done to hype You’re Dead and the new Captain Murphy, from the Death Grips meets Alex Grey album artwork to the Origins video to the Cosplay single to the You’re Dead Teaser, this is looking like a big year for him.  Maybe bigger than Cosmogramma.  If you haven’t grabbed a ticket for one of his shows now is the time, psychonauts!

Hazy days (daze) mix for those moments of mystified serenity in the deep cut caves

Alvvays / Adult Diversion

KNX / kerfew (777)

GodsConnect.  KNX.  Kerfew.  Soul.  On it.  Always.

“You can love someone so much… But you can never love people as much as you can miss them.”
-John Green from his novel An Abundance of Katherines

The Sad Demise of Nancy Lee, One of Britain’s Ketamine Casualtiesby Max Daly (VICE)"Cocaine, MDMA, mephedrone, and LSD can end up damaging people and some can become addictive, but it appears none of these drugs has the ability to wreck the body or leave users mentally marooned in the way that ketamine does. Rather than being a window into the soul, for some ketamine has turned into a way of mollifying pain or getting through the day" -Max Daly"If I didn’t commit myself 40 hours a week to my job I would be on it all the time, or struggling with myself not to be. Even though I’m ‘clean,’ this is only by default, from changing my social groups and prioritizing life, love, and work over ketamine. If you put the stuff in front of me now I’d still do it. It’s more powerful than I ever anticipated" -Laura, call-center manager from BristolKetamine is that crazy wobbly-leg drug. The wacky-student drug, the post-club chill-out aid, the new-gen LSD that gives users the power to become—according to 1970s K-hole explorer and dolphin whisperer John C. Lilly—“peeping toms at the keyhole of eternity.” But its reputation as a popular recreational drug, since filtering into the mainstream via the gay-clubbing and free-party scenes in the 2000s, does not tell the whole story of what’s going on in modern British K-land.
Apart from a brief paragraph in the Brighton Argus’s obituary column, Nancy Lee’s drug death went unreported. There was no shock factor: She hadn’t collapsed in public from a toxic reaction to a pill or a line of powder in a club. Instead, at the age of 23, Nancy had died slowly over seven years, her body trashed by a steady diet of ketamine.
Nancy started using ketamine at age 16 when she made new friends. Most teenagers getting high in the local Brighton park were necking cider and smoking skunk, but Nancy and her group of indie-kid outsiders used the open spaces to take ketamine. It was cheap, at 12 grams for about $150, and, important for Nancy, it transported her away from real life.
“She was sensitive and very caring, but Nancy was a misfit,” her father Jim, a college lecturer, told me. “She was bullied at school because of a bad squint and for being a tomboy. She had a victim mentality, a feeling that the world was against her.” It’s just that Nancy ended up finding solace in ketamine. “If someone were to design the perfect drug for a teenager who is depressed and doesn’t have much money, this would be it,” Jim said.
Nancy’s older sister Libby told me that when Nancy starting using the drug regularly it left her stuck in a teenage world from which she was never able to escape. “When I asked her why she couldn’t just stop taking it she said ketamine allowed her to get away from her life,” Libby said. “She told me she took it because she didn’t want to be herself.”
Meanwhile in reality, outside of ketamine’s cartoon world, Nancy’s body was beginning to disintegrate because she was taking ketamine but rarely eating, exercising, or drinking water. At 21, because of the effects of heavy ketamine use on her bladder and appetite, Nancy was incontinent, suffering from a weak heart due to malnutrition, and weighed 73 pounds. Her kidneys and bladder were barely functioning. She slept in the day and went out at night and flitted between her mother’s and various friends’ places, so no one knew how seriously ill she was until Jim intervened and took her to the hospital, where he was told by doctors that her condition was life-threatening.
After spending five weeks on a urology ward surrounded by elderly patients, Nancy was discharged, but she was warned that she could have caused long-term damage to her body. In the end, it proved worse than that.(Continue reading here)

The Sad Demise of Nancy Lee, One of Britain’s Ketamine Casualties
by Max Daly (VICE)

"Cocaine, MDMA, mephedrone, and LSD can end up damaging people and some can become addictive, but it appears none of these drugs has the ability to wreck the body or leave users mentally marooned in the way that ketamine does. Rather than being a window into the soul, for some ketamine has turned into a way of mollifying pain or getting through the day" -Max Daly

"If I didn’t commit myself 40 hours a week to my job I would be on it all the time, or struggling with myself not to be. Even though I’m ‘clean,’ this is only by default, from changing my social groups and prioritizing life, love, and work over ketamine. If you put the stuff in front of me now I’d still do it. It’s more powerful than I ever anticipated" -Laura, call-center manager from Bristol

Ketamine is that crazy wobbly-leg drug. The wacky-student drug, the post-club chill-out aid, the new-gen LSD that gives users the power to become—according to 1970s K-hole explorer and dolphin whisperer John C. Lilly—“peeping toms at the keyhole of eternity.” But its reputation as a popular recreational drug, since filtering into the mainstream via the gay-clubbing and free-party scenes in the 2000s, does not tell the whole story of what’s going on in modern British K-land.

Apart from a brief paragraph in the Brighton Argus’s obituary column, Nancy Lee’s drug death went unreported. There was no shock factor: She hadn’t collapsed in public from a toxic reaction to a pill or a line of powder in a club. Instead, at the age of 23, Nancy had died slowly over seven years, her body trashed by a steady diet of ketamine.

Nancy started using ketamine at age 16 when she made new friends. Most teenagers getting high in the local Brighton park were necking cider and smoking skunk, but Nancy and her group of indie-kid outsiders used the open spaces to take ketamine. It was cheap, at 12 grams for about $150, and, important for Nancy, it transported her away from real life.

“She was sensitive and very caring, but Nancy was a misfit,” her father Jim, a college lecturer, told me. “She was bullied at school because of a bad squint and for being a tomboy. She had a victim mentality, a feeling that the world was against her.” It’s just that Nancy ended up finding solace in ketamine. “If someone were to design the perfect drug for a teenager who is depressed and doesn’t have much money, this would be it,” Jim said.

Nancy’s older sister Libby told me that when Nancy starting using the drug regularly it left her stuck in a teenage world from which she was never able to escape. “When I asked her why she couldn’t just stop taking it she said ketamine allowed her to get away from her life,” Libby said. “She told me she took it because she didn’t want to be herself.”

Meanwhile in reality, outside of ketamine’s cartoon world, Nancy’s body was beginning to disintegrate because she was taking ketamine but rarely eating, exercising, or drinking water. At 21, because of the effects of heavy ketamine use on her bladder and appetite, Nancy was incontinent, suffering from a weak heart due to malnutrition, and weighed 73 pounds. Her kidneys and bladder were barely functioning. She slept in the day and went out at night and flitted between her mother’s and various friends’ places, so no one knew how seriously ill she was until Jim intervened and took her to the hospital, where he was told by doctors that her condition was life-threatening.

After spending five weeks on a urology ward surrounded by elderly patients, Nancy was discharged, but she was warned that she could have caused long-term damage to her body. In the end, it proved worse than that.

(Continue reading here)

Luvless /// We Need To

Action Bronson  /  Easy Rider

Zany new single off Bronsolino’s new Mr. Wonderful LP. Respects to Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, and Peter Rosenberg

Easy Rider