Yeyo Belafonte



The Celestics - 173 (Feat. Waldo) (Pipo Version)

The Celestics (Kaytranada & his brother Louie P) have teamed up with youngin Waldo and Mortal Kombat murked one of Kay’s heaviest productions to date in a surprisingly boastful yet astoundingly impressive and convincing way.  A little jarring horn at first, a little slow and potentially unmemorable build, but the hit removes all doubts of trap kingship and blows the trio further past their bigger contemporaries like Migos, Quan, and Young Thug.

Kaytranada, Waldo, The Celestics, GoldLink, Sango, Tom Misch, Jeremih, Evian Christ, Stwo, Ta-ku, Azizi Gibson, ESTA., LAKIM, Mr. Carmack, HW&W, and Soulection are really on something here

Flying Lotus - Never Catch Me (Feat. Kendrick Lamar)

New FlyLo goes in on the jazz tip.  Didn’t know if K Dot would work well with Fly but this bests the Herbie Hancock feature he released by continents. With all he’s done to hype You’re Dead and the new Captain Murphy, from the Death Grips meets Alex Grey album artwork to the Origins video to the Cosplay single to the You’re Dead Teaser, this is looking like a big year for him.  Maybe bigger than Cosmogramma.  If you haven’t grabbed a ticket for one of his shows now is the time, psychonauts!

Hazy days (daze) mix for those moments of mystified serenity in the deep cut caves

Alvvays / Adult Diversion

KNX / kerfew (777)

GodsConnect.  KNX.  Kerfew.  Soul.  On it.  Always.

“You can love someone so much… But you can never love people as much as you can miss them.”
-John Green from his novel An Abundance of Katherines

The Sad Demise of Nancy Lee, One of Britain’s Ketamine Casualtiesby Max Daly (VICE)"Cocaine, MDMA, mephedrone, and LSD can end up damaging people and some can become addictive, but it appears none of these drugs has the ability to wreck the body or leave users mentally marooned in the way that ketamine does. Rather than being a window into the soul, for some ketamine has turned into a way of mollifying pain or getting through the day" -Max Daly"If I didn’t commit myself 40 hours a week to my job I would be on it all the time, or struggling with myself not to be. Even though I’m ‘clean,’ this is only by default, from changing my social groups and prioritizing life, love, and work over ketamine. If you put the stuff in front of me now I’d still do it. It’s more powerful than I ever anticipated" -Laura, call-center manager from BristolKetamine is that crazy wobbly-leg drug. The wacky-student drug, the post-club chill-out aid, the new-gen LSD that gives users the power to become—according to 1970s K-hole explorer and dolphin whisperer John C. Lilly—“peeping toms at the keyhole of eternity.” But its reputation as a popular recreational drug, since filtering into the mainstream via the gay-clubbing and free-party scenes in the 2000s, does not tell the whole story of what’s going on in modern British K-land.
Apart from a brief paragraph in the Brighton Argus’s obituary column, Nancy Lee’s drug death went unreported. There was no shock factor: She hadn’t collapsed in public from a toxic reaction to a pill or a line of powder in a club. Instead, at the age of 23, Nancy had died slowly over seven years, her body trashed by a steady diet of ketamine.
Nancy started using ketamine at age 16 when she made new friends. Most teenagers getting high in the local Brighton park were necking cider and smoking skunk, but Nancy and her group of indie-kid outsiders used the open spaces to take ketamine. It was cheap, at 12 grams for about $150, and, important for Nancy, it transported her away from real life.
“She was sensitive and very caring, but Nancy was a misfit,” her father Jim, a college lecturer, told me. “She was bullied at school because of a bad squint and for being a tomboy. She had a victim mentality, a feeling that the world was against her.” It’s just that Nancy ended up finding solace in ketamine. “If someone were to design the perfect drug for a teenager who is depressed and doesn’t have much money, this would be it,” Jim said.
Nancy’s older sister Libby told me that when Nancy starting using the drug regularly it left her stuck in a teenage world from which she was never able to escape. “When I asked her why she couldn’t just stop taking it she said ketamine allowed her to get away from her life,” Libby said. “She told me she took it because she didn’t want to be herself.”
Meanwhile in reality, outside of ketamine’s cartoon world, Nancy’s body was beginning to disintegrate because she was taking ketamine but rarely eating, exercising, or drinking water. At 21, because of the effects of heavy ketamine use on her bladder and appetite, Nancy was incontinent, suffering from a weak heart due to malnutrition, and weighed 73 pounds. Her kidneys and bladder were barely functioning. She slept in the day and went out at night and flitted between her mother’s and various friends’ places, so no one knew how seriously ill she was until Jim intervened and took her to the hospital, where he was told by doctors that her condition was life-threatening.
After spending five weeks on a urology ward surrounded by elderly patients, Nancy was discharged, but she was warned that she could have caused long-term damage to her body. In the end, it proved worse than that.(Continue reading here)

The Sad Demise of Nancy Lee, One of Britain’s Ketamine Casualties
by Max Daly (VICE)

"Cocaine, MDMA, mephedrone, and LSD can end up damaging people and some can become addictive, but it appears none of these drugs has the ability to wreck the body or leave users mentally marooned in the way that ketamine does. Rather than being a window into the soul, for some ketamine has turned into a way of mollifying pain or getting through the day" -Max Daly

"If I didn’t commit myself 40 hours a week to my job I would be on it all the time, or struggling with myself not to be. Even though I’m ‘clean,’ this is only by default, from changing my social groups and prioritizing life, love, and work over ketamine. If you put the stuff in front of me now I’d still do it. It’s more powerful than I ever anticipated" -Laura, call-center manager from Bristol

Ketamine is that crazy wobbly-leg drug. The wacky-student drug, the post-club chill-out aid, the new-gen LSD that gives users the power to become—according to 1970s K-hole explorer and dolphin whisperer John C. Lilly—“peeping toms at the keyhole of eternity.” But its reputation as a popular recreational drug, since filtering into the mainstream via the gay-clubbing and free-party scenes in the 2000s, does not tell the whole story of what’s going on in modern British K-land.

Apart from a brief paragraph in the Brighton Argus’s obituary column, Nancy Lee’s drug death went unreported. There was no shock factor: She hadn’t collapsed in public from a toxic reaction to a pill or a line of powder in a club. Instead, at the age of 23, Nancy had died slowly over seven years, her body trashed by a steady diet of ketamine.

Nancy started using ketamine at age 16 when she made new friends. Most teenagers getting high in the local Brighton park were necking cider and smoking skunk, but Nancy and her group of indie-kid outsiders used the open spaces to take ketamine. It was cheap, at 12 grams for about $150, and, important for Nancy, it transported her away from real life.

“She was sensitive and very caring, but Nancy was a misfit,” her father Jim, a college lecturer, told me. “She was bullied at school because of a bad squint and for being a tomboy. She had a victim mentality, a feeling that the world was against her.” It’s just that Nancy ended up finding solace in ketamine. “If someone were to design the perfect drug for a teenager who is depressed and doesn’t have much money, this would be it,” Jim said.

Nancy’s older sister Libby told me that when Nancy starting using the drug regularly it left her stuck in a teenage world from which she was never able to escape. “When I asked her why she couldn’t just stop taking it she said ketamine allowed her to get away from her life,” Libby said. “She told me she took it because she didn’t want to be herself.”

Meanwhile in reality, outside of ketamine’s cartoon world, Nancy’s body was beginning to disintegrate because she was taking ketamine but rarely eating, exercising, or drinking water. At 21, because of the effects of heavy ketamine use on her bladder and appetite, Nancy was incontinent, suffering from a weak heart due to malnutrition, and weighed 73 pounds. Her kidneys and bladder were barely functioning. She slept in the day and went out at night and flitted between her mother’s and various friends’ places, so no one knew how seriously ill she was until Jim intervened and took her to the hospital, where he was told by doctors that her condition was life-threatening.

After spending five weeks on a urology ward surrounded by elderly patients, Nancy was discharged, but she was warned that she could have caused long-term damage to her body. In the end, it proved worse than that.

(Continue reading here)

Luvless /// We Need To

Action Bronson  /  Easy Rider

Zany new single off Bronsolino’s new Mr. Wonderful LP. Respects to Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, and Peter Rosenberg

Easy Rider

Nas - Represent (Official Video)

"In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of his seminal debut album Illmatic, Nas held a contest inviting fans to collaborate and produce the official music video for "Represent," an influential track off of the classic release. This is the first video ever made for the track and was shot at the YouTube Space Los Angeles.

Nas’ seminal debut album, Illmatic, has been released as a special 20th Anniversary Edition, titled Illmatic XX, available now. This exclusive collection features several rare remixes, unreleased demos and freestyles to commemorate the anniversary.”

VICE On Tim Freccia’s newest exhibition, Life and Death:
"While Danger may not be Tim Freccia's middle name, he has certainly been no stranger to it throughout his life. At age 16 he worked as a commercial fisherman in Alaska, before pursuing a career in photography that quickly included documenting Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s rise to power in Haiti and interviewing Nelson Mandela. VICE readers will recognize his work from VICE's April “Saving South Sudan” issue, for which he was the sole photographer.
The spirit of Freccia’s new exhibition, Life and Death, a series of portraits of the Nuer White Army and their Dinka adversaries, has little to do with documenting danger. True, the subjects of his portraits are currently engaged in a bloody conflict in South Sudan, and yes, many members of the White Army wield guns, and the Dinka are incredibly physically imposing in the pictures. But the emphasis in each portrait is on displaying a fundamental humanness. Each subject is shot against a white background, mostly looking right into the camera, and thus at the viewer. Moreover, the photographs are printed life-size, so each person appears almost as if they were present in the room. The effect is one that presents the subjects not as members of opposing forces at war, but as individuals first.”(Read the rest of the article here)

VICE On Tim Freccia’s newest exhibition, Life and Death:

"While Danger may not be Tim Freccia's middle name, he has certainly been no stranger to it throughout his life. At age 16 he worked as a commercial fisherman in Alaska, before pursuing a career in photography that quickly included documenting Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s rise to power in Haiti and interviewing Nelson Mandela. VICE readers will recognize his work from VICE's April “Saving South Sudan” issue, for which he was the sole photographer.

The spirit of Freccia’s new exhibition, Life and Death, a series of portraits of the Nuer White Army and their Dinka adversaries, has little to do with documenting danger. True, the subjects of his portraits are currently engaged in a bloody conflict in South Sudan, and yes, many members of the White Army wield guns, and the Dinka are incredibly physically imposing in the pictures. But the emphasis in each portrait is on displaying a fundamental humanness. Each subject is shot against a white background, mostly looking right into the camera, and thus at the viewer. Moreover, the photographs are printed life-size, so each person appears almost as if they were present in the room. The effect is one that presents the subjects not as members of opposing forces at war, but as individuals first.”

(Read the rest of the article here)

SHIRT. - BENGAL TIGER

SHIRT. might have been in some other ish with his NY Times debacle but this man is vicious 101 when he gets hold of a Bronson, Marciano, or eXquire beat. Queens for the killshot, dun