Yeyo Belafonte



Rest In Peace Gabriel García MárquezMarch 6th, 1927 - April 17th, 2014"If I knew that today would be the last time I’d see you, I would hug you tight and pray the Lord be the keeper of your soul. If I knew that this would be the last time you pass through this door, I’d embrace you, kiss you, and call you back for one more. If I knew that this would be the last time I would hear your voice, I’d take hold of each word to be able to hear it over and over again. If I knew this is the last time I see you, I’d tell you I love you, and would not just assume foolishly you know it already." -MárquezToday we say goodbye to one of the most loved and respected authors of our time.  Not only did Gabriel, known as Gabo, write Cien años de soledad, a novel that Pablo Neruda said was “the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since the Don Quixote of Cervantes,” he inspired a generation to tell the realities of life in less traditional approaches.  His style of writing has been referred to as magic realism, but since this can be seen as dichotomizing many scholars reject this term.  When Márquez was asked about the title and how his European readers might not be seeing the reality behind the magic, he said, “This is surely because their rationalism prevents them seeing that reality isn’t limited to the price of tomatoes and eggs.”  He might have been a lover, but this man knew his way around a jab.  I must admit that when I first read some of Cien años de soledad in high school I treated it like it was just another novel forced upon me with dated themes unrelatable to the life of a Nickelodeon kid; however, thanks to the time I’ve spent studying literature in my Spanish classes I now feel a more meaningful appreciation of his work and legacy. As he would put it: ”What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.”I’ll remember him as the most emotionally intelligent writer I’ve ever given the chance to touch my heart and soul. RIP Gabo

Rest In Peace Gabriel García Márquez
March 6th, 1927 - April 17th, 2014

"If I knew that today would be the last time I’d see you, I would hug you tight and pray the Lord be the keeper of your soul. If I knew that this would be the last time you pass through this door, I’d embrace you, kiss you, and call you back for one more. If I knew that this would be the last time I would hear your voice, I’d take hold of each word to be able to hear it over and over again. If I knew this is the last time I see you, I’d tell you I love you, and would not just assume foolishly you know it already." -Márquez

Today we say goodbye to one of the most loved and respected authors of our time.  Not only did Gabriel, known as Gabo, write Cien años de soledad, a novel that Pablo Neruda said was “the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since the Don Quixote of Cervantes,” he inspired a generation to tell the realities of life in less traditional approaches.  His style of writing has been referred to as magic realism, but since this can be seen as dichotomizing many scholars reject this term.  When Márquez was asked about the title and how his European readers might not be seeing the reality behind the magic, he said, “This is surely because their rationalism prevents them seeing that reality isn’t limited to the price of tomatoes and eggs.”  He might have been a lover, but this man knew his way around a jab.  I must admit that when I first read some of Cien años de soledad in high school I treated it like it was just another novel forced upon me with dated themes unrelatable to the life of a Nickelodeon kid; however, thanks to the time I’ve spent studying literature in my Spanish classes I now feel a more meaningful appreciation of his work and legacy. As he would put it: 

What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.

I’ll remember him as the most emotionally intelligent writer I’ve ever given the chance to touch my heart and soul. RIP Gabo

vicemag:

How the ‘Ndrangheta Quietly Became the McDonald’s of Mafias
Last year the ‘Ndrangheta—a criminal organization from Calabria, a region that forms the toe of Italy’s boot—raked in more than $75.3 billion. That’s equivalent to revenue of McDonald’s and Deutsche Bank combined, or 3.5 per cent of Italy’s GDP in 2013. It did this through, among other things, extortion, usury, gambling, prostitution, and the trafficking of both drugs and humans.

vicemag:

How the ‘Ndrangheta Quietly Became the McDonald’s of Mafias

Last year the ‘Ndrangheta—a criminal organization from Calabria, a region that forms the toe of Italy’s boot—raked in more than $75.3 billion. That’s equivalent to revenue of McDonald’s and Deutsche Bank combined, or 3.5 per cent of Italy’s GDP in 2013. It did this through, among other things, extortion, usury, gambling, prostitution, and the trafficking of both drugs and humans.

cosmonaut grechko - Anytime

Glossy, vibrant track brought to the picnic table by Russian Super Music Group affiliate cosmonaut grechko .

You know how around the beginning of a season there are always a few tracks that as soon as you hear them you know what good/bad times to expect from the next few months? You don’t, but that doesn’t stop those songs from seeming like harbingers. We had Bibio’s Ambivalence Avenue album in 2009 to mark a beautiful summer. Houses - Endless Spring in 2010 reminded us of how precious the warm weather is to our sanity. Panda Bear’s Last Night At The Jetty stood strong as a climactic end to a vicious winter in 2011. 2012 brought alternative hip hop to the forefront with Death Grip’s Money Store focusing on our crazed animalistic side in April and FlyLo’s dark alter ego, Captain Murphy, dropping cult-like tunes on Duality to mark the coming of gray skies in November. 2013 brought the resurrection of electronic music sans dubstep headed by the likes of Gesaffelstein, Jon Hopkins, and Disclosure, whose May album Settle reigned supreme as the anthem of the summer.

And as for 2014? Well, say hello to ”Fuck yes, we are about to have sunshine again!” Slightly reminiscent of the self-titled Teams vs. Star Slinger EP, Anytime is sure to put you in the mood to kick your feet up and sip on that Cherry Limeade you’ve had in the back of your fridge since August

Trus’me // Toxic Flowers (ReRubWorkOut)

Trus’me crushes Andrew Ashong & Theo Parrish’s Flowers in some tribal house type of way

Seinfeld

STRANGE U - STRANGE UNIVERSE IN AFRICA

Impromptu banger from UK hip hop heavyweight Strange U dropped last month. Here’s to hoping Eglo Records follows through on their announcement about a future EP

Don’t sleep on Augustus Hill. His narration (breaking the fourth wall) in Oz make Leo’s in Wolf of Wall Street & Kevin Spacey’s in House of Cards look like child’s play

- ”And love? Well, if sex is sweet and death is bitter, love is both. Love will always and forever break your heart.” Season 1, Episode 2

- “I ain’t saying drugs are good. But when your past is past and your present sucks and your future holds nothing but broken promises and dead dreams, the drugs’ll kill the pain. Listen up, America, you ain’t ever gonna get rid of drugs until you cure pain.” Season 1, Episode 5

- “I was addicted to crack. Then I had my accident. Lying in the hospital bed, I went through detox. But that was easy. The doctors had me on Morphine, Demerol, Percodan. I didn’t know I was in pain, I didn’t know I was in the hospital, paralyzed. Then I came here, went into counseling. I take it one day at a time, you know. But every day I think about drugs. About not doing drugs. Every single day, every single hour, every single minute, staying straight has become my obsession. My new addiction.” Season 1, Episode 6

- “So, what separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom? What makes us so different? We’re the only species who put our own kind in cages.” Season 2, Episode 7

- “Clemency. That’s a fancy word for mercy. You see, the Governor can commute a death sentence. He has the power to just pick up the phone and say no. But to me, the only time the Governor shows clemency, is when he don’t make that call. ‘Cause life in prison without parole is a shitload worse than death. Death is parole. Death is the real mercy.” Season 2, Episode 8

- “When you take revenge on somebody, you are actually paying them the highest compliment possible. It’s like saying, “You’ve affected my life to such an extent that I must reciprocate. I must affect your life as deeply as you have mine”. Revenge may be the ultimate Hallmark card. Yeah. When you think of it like that, the cliché is true. Revenge *is* sweet.” Season 4, Episode 11

- “The worst stab wound is the one to the heart. Sure, most people survive it, but the heart is never quite the same. There’s always a scar, which I guess, is meant to remind you that even for a little while, someone made your heart beat faster. And that’s a scar you can live with, proudly. All the days of your life.” Season 4, Episode 12

Chance The Rapper - The Writer

I’m a writer, probably good as Elton John
But what’s writing good for if it ain’t helpin Moms?
I’m trying to feed Japan while seein sights of Lebanon
And wipin away tears of the girls that’s gettin felted on
I’m trying to get my felt pen on, but the block is hot
My hands is questioning if I’m Bach or not
If I’m 2Pac or nonexistent to these juggernauts
But I’m an architect, an astronaut, an Argonaut


Michael Grab
 has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”

(Source: headyhunter, via twofortuesday)